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Author
Last Commit
May. 22, 2019
Created
Feb. 23, 2015

goavro

Goavro is a library that encodes and decodes Avro data.

Description

  • Encodes to and decodes from both binary and textual JSON Avro data.
  • Codec is stateless and is safe to use by multiple goroutines.

With the exception of features not yet supported, goavro attempts to be fully compliant with the most recent version of the Avro specification.

Dependency Notice

All usage of gopkg.in has been removed in favor of Go modules. Please update your import paths to github.com/linkedin/goavro/v2. v1 users can still use old versions of goavro by adding a constraint to your go.mod or Gopkg.toml file.

require (
    github.com/linkedin/goavro v1.0.5
)
[[constraint]]
name = "github.com/linkedin/goavro"
version = "=1.0.5"

Major Improvements in v2 over v1

Avro namespaces

The original version of this library was written prior to my really understanding how Avro namespaces ought to work. After using Avro for a long time now, and after a lot of research, I think I grok Avro namespaces properly, and the library now correctly handles every test case the Apache Avro distribution has for namespaces, including being able to refer to a previously defined data type later on in the same schema.

Getting Data into and out of Records

The original version of this library required creating goavro.Record instances, and use of getters and setters to access a record's fields. When schemas were complex, this required a lot of work to debug and get right. The original version also required users to break schemas in chunks, and have a different schema for each record type. This was cumbersome, annoying, and error prone.

The new version of this library eliminates the goavro.Record type, and accepts a native Go map for all records to be encoded. Keys are the field names, and values are the field values. Nothing could be more easy. Conversely, decoding Avro data yields a native Go map for the upstream client to pull data back out of.

Furthermore, there is never a reason to ever have to break your schema down into record schemas. Merely feed the entire schema into the NewCodec function once when you create the Codec, then use it. This library knows how to parse the data provided to it and ensure data values for records and their fields are properly encoded and decoded.

3x--4x Performance Improvement

The original version of this library was truly written with Go's idea of io.Reader and io.Writer composition in mind. Although composition is a powerful tool, the original library had to pull bytes off the io.Reader--often one byte at a time--check for read errors, decode the bytes, and repeat. This version, by using a native Go byte slice, both decoding and encoding complex Avro data here at LinkedIn is between three and four times faster than before.

Avro JSON Support

The original version of this library did not support JSON encoding or decoding, because it wasn't deemed useful for our internal use at the time. When writing the new version of the library I decided to tackle this issue once and for all, because so many engineers needed this functionality for their work.

Better Handling of Record Field Default Values

The original version of this library did not well handle default values for record fields. This version of the library uses a default value of a record field when encoding from native Go data to Avro data and the record field is not specified. Additionally, when decoding from Avro JSON data to native Go data, and a field is not specified, the default value will be used to populate the field.

Contrast With Code Generation Tools

If you have the ability to rebuild and redeploy your software whenever data schemas change, code generation tools might be the best solution for your application.

There are numerous excellent tools for generating source code to translate data between native and Avro binary or textual data. One such tool is linked below. If a particular application is designed to work with a rarely changing schema, programs that use code generated functions can potentially be more performant than a program that uses goavro to create a Codec dynamically at run time.

I recommend benchmarking the resultant programs using typical data using both the code generated functions and using goavro to see which performs better. Not all code generated functions will out perform goavro for all data corpuses.

If you don't have the ability to rebuild and redeploy software updates whenever a data schema change occurs, goavro could be a great fit for your needs. With goavro, your program can be given a new schema while running, compile it into a Codec on the fly, and immediately start encoding or decoding data using that Codec. Because Avro encoding specifies that encoded data always be accompanied by a schema this is not usually a problem. If the schema change is backwards compatible, and the portion of your program that handles the decoded data is still able to reference the decoded fields, there is nothing that needs to be done when the schema change is detected by your program when using goavro Codec instances to encode or decode data.

Resources

Usage

Documentation is available via GoDoc.

package main

import (
    "fmt"

    "github.com/linkedin/goavro/v2"
)

func main() {
    codec, err := goavro.NewCodec(`
        {
          "type": "record",
          "name": "LongList",
          "fields" : [
            {"name": "next", "type": ["null", "LongList"], "default": null}
          ]
        }`)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }

    // NOTE: May omit fields when using default value
    textual := []byte(`{"next":{"LongList":{}}}`)

    // Convert textual Avro data (in Avro JSON format) to native Go form
    native, _, err := codec.NativeFromTextual(textual)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }

    // Convert native Go form to binary Avro data
    binary, err := codec.BinaryFromNative(nil, native)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }

    // Convert binary Avro data back to native Go form
    native, _, err = codec.NativeFromBinary(binary)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }

    // Convert native Go form to textual Avro data
    textual, err = codec.TextualFromNative(nil, native)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }

    // NOTE: Textual encoding will show all fields, even those with values that
    // match their default values
    fmt.Println(string(textual))
    // Output: {"next":{"LongList":{"next":null}}}
}

Also please see the example programs in the examples directory for reference.

ab2t

The ab2t program is similar to the reference standard avrocat program and converts Avro OCF files to Avro JSON encoding.

arw

The Avro-ReWrite program, arw, can be used to rewrite an Avro OCF file while optionally changing the block counts, the compression algorithm. arw can also upgrade the schema provided the existing datum values can be encoded with the newly provided schema.

avroheader

The Avro Header program, avroheader, can be used to print various header information from an OCF file.

splice

The splice program can be used to splice together an OCF file from an Avro schema file and a raw Avro binary data file.

Translating Data

A Codec provides four methods for translating between a byte slice of either binary or textual Avro data and native Go data.

The following methods convert data between native Go data and byte slices of the binary Avro representation:

BinaryFromNative
NativeFromBinary

The following methods convert data between native Go data and byte slices of the textual Avro representation:

NativeFromTextual
TextualFromNative

Each Codec also exposes the Schema method to return a simplified version of the JSON schema string used to create the Codec.

Translating From Avro to Go Data

Goavro does not use Go's structure tags to translate data between native Go types and Avro encoded data.

When translating from either binary or textual Avro to native Go data, goavro returns primitive Go data values for corresponding Avro data values. The table below shows how goavro translates Avro types to Go types.

Avro Go    
null nil
boolean bool
bytes []byte
float float32
double float64
long int64
int int32  
string string
array []interface{}
enum string
fixed []byte      
map and record map[string]interface{}
union see below   

Because of encoding rules for Avro unions, when an union's value is null, a simple Go nil is returned. However when an union's value is non-nil, a Go map[string]interface{} with a single key is returned for the union. The map's single key is the Avro type name and its value is the datum's value.

Translating From Go to Avro Data

Goavro does not use Go's structure tags to translate data between native Go types and Avro encoded data.

When translating from native Go to either binary or textual Avro data, goavro generally requires the same native Go data types as the decoder would provide, with some exceptions for programmer convenience. Goavro will accept any numerical data type provided there is no precision lost when encoding the value. For instance, providing float64(3.0) to an encoder expecting an Avro int would succeed, while sending float64(3.5) to the same encoder would return an error.

When providing a slice of items for an encoder, the encoder will accept either []interface{}, or any slice of the required type. For instance, when the Avro schema specifies: {"type":"array","items":"string"}, the encoder will accept either []interface{}, or []string. If given []int, the encoder will return an error when it attempts to encode the first non-string array value using the string encoder.

When providing a value for an Avro union, the encoder will accept nil for a null value. If the value is non-nil, it must be a map[string]interface{} with a single key-value pair, where the key is the Avro type name and the value is the datum's value. As a convenience, the Union function wraps any datum value in a map as specified above.

func ExampleUnion() {
    codec, err := goavro.NewCodec(`["null","string","int"]`)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    buf, err := codec.TextualFromNative(nil, goavro.Union("string", "some string"))
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    fmt.Println(string(buf))
    // Output: {"string":"some string"}
}

Limitations

Goavro is a fully featured encoder and decoder of binary and textual JSON Avro data. It fully supports recursive data structures, unions, and namespacing. It does have a few limitations that have yet to be implemented.

Aliases

The Avro specification allows an implementation to optionally map a writer's schema to a reader's schema using aliases. Although goavro can compile schemas with aliases, it does not yet implement this feature.

Kafka Streams

Kafka is the reason goavro was written. Similar to Avro Object Container Files being a layer of abstraction above Avro Data Serialization format, Kafka's use of Avro is a layer of abstraction that also sits above Avro Data Serialization format, but has its own schema. Like Avro Object Container Files, this has been implemented but removed until the API can be improved.

Default Maximum Block Counts, and Block Sizes

When decoding arrays, maps, and OCF files, the Avro specification states that the binary includes block counts and block sizes that specify how many items are in the next block, and how many bytes are in the next block. To prevent possible denial-of-service attacks on clients that use this library caused by attempting to decode maliciously crafted data, decoded block counts and sizes are compared against public library variables MaxBlockCount and MaxBlockSize. When the decoded values exceed these values, the decoder returns an error.

Because not every upstream client is the same, we've chosen some sane defaults for these values, but left them as mutable variables, so that clients are able to override if deemed necessary for their purposes. Their initial default values are (math.MaxInt32 or ~2.2GB).

License

Goavro license

Copyright 2017 LinkedIn Corp. Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance with the License. You may obtain a copy of the License at http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.

Google Snappy license

Copyright (c) 2011 The Snappy-Go Authors. All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

  • Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
  • Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
  • Neither the name of Google Inc. nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

Third Party Dependencies

Google Snappy

Goavro links with Google Snappy to provide Snappy compression and decompression support.

Latest Releases
v2.8.5
 May. 13 2019
v2.8.4
 May. 6 2019
v2.8.3
 Apr. 29 2019
v2.8.2
 Apr. 29 2019
v2.8.1
 Apr. 29 2019